Interview mit Dr. Wayne Dyer

 Interview mit Dr. Wayne Dyer

Mit großer Freude präsentiere ich Ihnen hier ein Interview mit Dr. Wayne Dyer, dem weltweit bekannten Autoren.

Dieses Interview fand anlässlich des internationalen “Tapping World Summit 2014″ statt, an dem weltweit bereits über 500 000  Menschen teilnehmen. Dieser Event stellt eine absolute Innovation dar, denn anerkannte Wissenschaftler und Experten  bekennen sich zu den Wirkungen der energetischen Psychologie und EFT.

Über einen Zeitraum von 2 Wochen gaben Wissenschaftler, Psychologen, Therapeuten und Fachleute vieler Richtungen kostenlose Anleitungen, Workshops und Fachberichte über die Meridian Tapping Techniques und EFT.  Unsere Newsletter-Empfänger werden über diese Termine  natürlich zeitgerecht informiert.

Dr. Waye Dyer hat viele millionen Anhänger und hat mit seinen Büchern Friede und Harmonie für die Menschen gebracht. In diesem Interview spricht er über sein Leben und den Einfluss, den EFT-Tapping auf seine Heilung hatte. Er berichtet über seine traurige Kindheit und über die Macht des Verzeihens. Und seine Freude darüber, dass er “Geben” kann – und das in beachtlichen Millionenbeträgen.

Ich wünsche auch Ihnen viel Freude mit den Inhalten dieses spannenden Interviews!

Ihre Margit
www.wellness-quelle.at

Mit freundlicher Genehmigung von   www.TappingWorldSummit.com
(c) 2014 The Tapping Solution, LLC

 

Nick: I’m here with my friend Wayne Dyer for the sixth annual Tapping World Summit. Instead of a long introduction we’ve just been talking about some pain.

Wayne: I love you, man.

Nick: Thank you. We’re going to do some tapping. We’re going to get right into it. There are people watching this video that have never seen tapping before. They say, what are these kooks doing?

Wayne: Really? I’m a big fan. I really am a big believer. I must say––then I asked, because we were together down in Melbourne, Australia and I was giving a talk and you were to follow me. The pain was so excruciating in my neck and in my back that for the first time in 40 years I had to be taken off the stage. You went right out there and did a whole tapping thing with a couple thousand people.

Nick: A couple thousand people, yep.

Wayne: You basically tapped for me, for the whole room. Thirty minutes later, or an hour later, you did about an hour.

Nick: Yep.

Wayne: I was back out onstage. I wasn’t able to stand, but I was able to sit and go through it. Then for the two weeks or so we were together in Australia we did tapping every single day.

Nick: Yep. There’s so much I want to talk to you about. You’ve been a mentor of mine for the last it’s got to be 15 years now. It used to just be on my iPod. I couldn’t get you in person, so it was just putting the iPod in and listening. Something that I’ve seen in your talks and your body of work is the theme of forgiveness throughout it, a really present theme. When we do the tapping, a big concept of it is in letting go of these things. I deeply and completely love and accept myself. Sometimes one of the things we’ll tap on is forgiveness, to let go of something that’s affected us in the past. Talk to me about forgiveness. What has it meant in your life and how has that concept played such a big part in your life?

Wayne: Mark Twain said that, “Forgiveness is the fragrance that the violet sheds on the heel that has crushed it.” It’s being able to send love. It’s being able to have love in your heart. I must say, Nick, that forgiveness is probably the single––if you had to put one word on why my life shifted when I was back in my thirties to a new direction, it was because of my forgiveness. My father, a man I never met, but he walked out on our family. My mother had three boys under the age of four. It was the Depression. I was born in 1940. My brothers were born in 1936, December, and then in 1938 in October and myself in May of 1940. So three-and-a-half years she had three children, and this man just left. He spent some time in prison. He was an alcoholic. He was abusive. He was a womanizer.

When my mother brought me home from the hospital in 1940, my father had moved in with another woman in Ann Arbor––we lived in Detroit, about 40 miles away––and left my oldest brother, who was just four, in charge of my other brother, David, who was 16 months. My mother came home to that. I heard those stories my whole life. I grew up with deep anger and resentment and hatred towards someone who could treat a woman that way.

Consequently, I was put into a series of foster homes and an orphanage until I was ten. My mother got us all back together again. All I ever did was I would have dreams all the time about this man. For the first ten years of my life I didn’t even know what the word father meant because I lived in a place where nobody had fathers, in an orphanage.

When I found out and then heard what he had done and how he had stolen from people, everything about this man I had ever heard was evil. I haven’t got time to tell the whole story, but I ended up at his grave in 1974. Ten years after he had died I found out, and I went down to his grave.

I actually went down there to do something else on his grave. I had no idea why I was being sent to go down there. I rented a car. I went through a lot of trouble to get down there. I stood on his gravesite in Biloxi, Mississippi, August 30, 1974. The first two hours that I was there all I did was curse him and ask, how could you possibly behave this way towards such a wonderful woman and have three boys and never make a phone call, never even check on us? I get tearful now even thinking about it.

I went back to the car to drive back to New Orleans and go back. I was teaching up in New York at a university there, at St. John’s University. Something called me back and said, go back to the grave. I got out of the car, went back to the gravesite and the words came out of my mouth. I said, from this moment on I send you love, I forgive you, I let go of it. I said, who am I to judge you for what you did? You knew what you knew how to do given the conditions of your life, and I send you love.

At that time I was 34 years old. I was overweight. I was drinking. My writing was going nowhere. I had written some textbooks, but it wasn’t the kind of writing that I really wanted to do, I was in a relationship that wasn’t working at all. I was basically on an involuntary suicide mission the way I was living my life. I wouldn’t have lived another ten years probably.

Anyway, my life was pretty much out of control. I was a writer, but I wasn’t writing the way I wanted to write. My relationships, I wasn’t very happy. I was overweight, out of shape and so on. I left New Orleans, flew back to New York, got an airplane and flew down to Ft. Lauderdale, and rented an apartment at the Spindrift Motel on A1A in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida in 1974, September.

In 14 days, that’s how long I had there, I wrote a book from cover to cover called Your Erroneous Zones, which became the number one selling book of the entire decade of the ‘70s, and today has probably 100 million copies in print all over the world in something like 47 languages.

Everything in my life changed when I got rid of the hatred, the anger, the bitterness, the rage. I used to wake up every night almost, I’d be sweating and angry and I’d be seeing my father in a bar someplace going up to him and grabbing him and saying, “How could you do that?”

The reason I went to my father’s grave is I just wanted to see the death certificate. I wanted to see if it was acknowledged that he had three children. It was. My name was on there. He had died of cirrhosis of the liver at the age of 49. Even as we sit here now, I can feel his presence around me. I did a film about him called My Greatest Teacher. He was my greatest teacher, because if I hadn’t been able to get that rage, that hatred, that anger out of me my life would have continued on that path.

Everything shifted in my life. I started running. I got into a real good exercise routine. I gave up drinking. I got into a beautiful relationship. My writing took off. Erroneous Zones became––the next one was Pulling Your Own Strings.

Today it’s 41 books later. I can attribute all of that to forgiveness. If you’ve got something in your heart that’s anything other than love, you’ve got to get it out. I think that’s a big part of what tapping is, is helping people get that out.

Nick: It is. It is. I’ve heard you tell that story probably a hundred times now and it doesn’t stop touching me.

Wayne: Yeah, me either.

Nick: Every time it just reminds us, who do I need to forgive, what do you need to let go? There are a couple things you shared that struck me as they relate to tapping. One is when we start tapping we tap on what’s called the negative, or what I like to call the truth, how we feel.

If someone came to me and they were angry we would say, “Even though I have all this anger, I have this rage towards my father and I’m so pissed off at him.” Sometimes we even curse and just really feel that emotion to experience it in the body, and then do the tapping to let it go. You did a very similar thing at the gravesite, where you had to have those two hours of expressing that rage.

Wayne: You can’t imagine the rage that I went through there.

Nick: There’s no video footage of that.

Wayne: I went there to piss on his grave. I was so filled with anger, and I felt that was what was drawing me to him. My other two brothers didn’t care. It’s interesting. They had no interest whatsoever. My oldest brother remembered him and would say he was just an asshole. Just let it go.

When my mother got us all back together when I was ten, I couldn’t even bring his name up she was so filled with rage. She just passed away about a year ago. She was 96. I just wonder if she’s reconnected. I will reconnect with my father because I feel his presence around me all the time. I really feel that he truly was the greatest teacher I ever had, and I think all of that rage is something that I had to express. Now I have nothing but love for him. It’s like there’s two sides to every story. Who knows what his childhood was like? I know that he was abandoned when he was a kid. I know that he was abused. That was his way of reacting to it.

Nick: I like to look at people and say––I’ve had so much experience working with people, and walking into someone that has this issue and all of a sudden you uncover all these traumas that you just never know when you see them walking down the street. Oh my gosh, the things that they went through. You see enough of that, as I know you’ve seen. You walk around and go, you know that person that was rude on the plane or that was angry here, angry there, they’re just working out their old traumas, the same demons that we’re all working through.

Wayne: It just depends on what you decide to have in your heart. That’s what I’ve learned. That’s where I am at this stage in my life is if we can fill ourselves with love and appreciation for, and be in a state of gratitude. Really, Nick, it boils down to what do you have inside? Every event of your life you have an opportunity to be in a state of gratitude for it. You would think that a ten-year-old boy who was filled with rage and everything. But as I stepped back, and I’ve just written a whole book about this called I Can See Clearly Now.

Looking back, I can see that when we are in these places where we think things shouldn’t be going the way they are, or we think that it’s unfortunate or somehow we’re being punished or it’s just not fair and all those kinds of things, that’s the time to be in a state of gratitude. That’s the time to just say, there’s something in this for me. Everything doesn’t just have to smell good and be right in order to be thankful for it. You can be thankful for all of those experiences. So many of the experiences that I’ve had in my life, while I was going through them I was unhappy about them. I can step back and look at them from the perspective of today. I wouldn’t be doing this interview if I hadn’t had that experience with my father.

Who’s to say, seriously, in a universe that has no beginning and no end, that’s infinite, so we have an infinite number of times to go through this life experience, who’s to say that my father’s whole life purpose wasn’t to come in, behave the way that he did in order to teach his youngest son how to forgive, and then he could teach millions of other people to do the same. Who knows how the whole universe works? Who am I to be judging any of that?

Nick: There’s a signup sheet for a drunk asshole.

Wayne: That’s right. Right.

Nick: They said, yeah, I can do the job.

Wayne: Right, exactly.

Nick: It’s going to be hard. You’re going to be a real jerk.

Wayne: Yeah, right.

Nick: I’d love to do some tapping on forgiveness. Last year for the Tapping World Summit we sat down with Louise Hay, who you know very well. People were very moved. She brought in a certain energy when she tapped on stuff. I would love to do––I’ll lead through a tapping, if you be my echo, to help people out there forgive. Let’s do this. It doesn’t have to always be a grand thing. We don’t expect to forgive our fathers for decades of abuse in one round of tapping. Sometimes it happens, but let’s just pick a minor thing to forgive. Somebody who annoyed you a week ago, or something that you’re holding onto your heart where you want to let go of a little bit.

Everyone out there watching pick something that you want to let go of. Pick something that happened recently. Pick someone you have anger towards. Pick something where you go, you know what, I want to experience a little forgiveness in my heart. Really feel that. I think one of the great things about tapping is really going to that feeling. Feeling the anger and going, where is it? Where do I have it in my body? What is it that I’m holding onto? We’ll do tapping together.

Tapping the side of the hand:
SH: Even though I have all this anger in my heart, I deeply and completely love and accept myself.
Even though it’s so hard to forgive this person, I choose to let go now.
Even though I’ve been holding onto so much anger, I choose to release it now.

EB: This anger,
SE: Towards this person,
UE: Or this thing that happened,
UN It’s so hard to let it go,
CH: Because I feel that I was right,
CB: And I don’t want to forgive them,
UA: Because I don’t want to condone this behavior,
TH: But it’s time to release this anger,
EB: It’s time to let go,
SE: Even just a little bit,
UE: Releasing this anger,
UN: Releasing this pain,
CH: From every cell in my body,
CB: Letting go,
UA: Letting it all go,
TH: Right now.

Deep breath. It’s in those little moments where we let go, where we forgive.

Wayne: Yeah. Even just that little bit. I was thinking about someone else who has done some things that I have felt upset about. I was thinking about that as we were doing the tapping, and I felt more peaceful about it.

Nick: You mean you still get upset at people?

Wayne: Absolutely, yeah.

Nick: I thought you had reached enlightenment. Oh boy.

Wayne: I have. Enlightenment is part of it.

Nick: Enlightenment is part of it, absolutely.

Wayne: Yeah, right.

Nick: I want to talk about the physical body. I think one of the big breakthroughs in tapping is that we’re not just having these experiences in our head. We’re thinking about them, but we’re also activating the somatic body response. We’re calming the amygdala. We’re having that relaxation response from doing the tapping while focusing on our challenge. I know in your life, you mentioned before, your physical body has been a big part of it from where you turned it around at 34 and started to exercise. Tell me, I know you ran eight miles a day for how long was it?

Wayne: I ran eight miles a day for 22 years without missing one day.

Nick: Can I just have you tell the story of the plane? It just cracks me up to no end. Talk about emotion and dedication.

Wayne: Some people call it obsessive. I just say, look, you brush your teeth––that’s what I used to say, you brush your teeth every day and you don’t call that obsessive. You go to the bathroom every day. You don’t say you’re obsessively going to the bathroom. One of the things I did every day was run. I ran eight miles when I started, and I stayed with it for 22 years until my wife said to me, she said I don’t think you could miss a day. She said, I would be much more impressed with you if you could not run one day. So I said, okay, I won’t run today. That was it. I didn’t run that day, and she was in shock. Then I ran seven more years without missing any until it was 29 years. I ran every day eight miles for 29 years, probably longer than you’ve been alive. Almost.

Nick: Almost, almost.

Wayne: I was flying down to Australia, and there’s an international dateline. You have the same day twice and then you miss a day. On the way down there you miss a day. It’s Tuesday and then it’s Thursday. I thought, oh my god, I’ve missed a day. So I got up out of my seat. First of all, I ran up and down the aisle until the flight attendant said, you can’t do this. This was on Qantas Airlines.

I went into the bathroom and I ran in place for a full hour. It was about eight miles, because I knew what my pace was. I came out of the bathroom on an airplane, sweat pouring down my face and everybody in line looking like, what were you doing in that bathroom? I did my eight miles. That’s how neurotic I was at the time.

Nick: I know you’ve done a lot with yoga. How important do you think the physical body is to the spiritual experience?

Wayne: If you don’t take care of it you don’t have any place else to live. It’s just such a gift and it’s so perfect. Based on what I’ve been going through just recently in my own life, a simple thing like a realignment where one hip is off, with not even realizing it you’re walking through life like this, and what an impact it can have on you. When you’re in chronic pain, when you’re in the kind of pain that I was in that pulled me off the stage, you begin to realize the significance of taking care of this perfect creation. It’s such a miracle, this body of ours. When you just think about it, what it’s capable of doing.

One of my most favorite people in the world is a little boy named Jesse. He’s two years old. Really, I’m 73 years old, I have eight children of my own, I love every one of my children deeply, but I’ve never known a love like I have for this little boy. There’s something, maybe it’s in my age or whatever it is, but just watching him learning to be alive and the excitement. It’s like the poet Wordsworth said that, “Heaven lies about us in our infancy.”

I always talk to him. I say, tell me what god is like. Come on. I know you know. You were just there. I’m going to be there soon, but I want to know more. Just the joy of being around this little two-year-old, it’s just thrilling to me. I’m teaching him how to swim, and just all the little things that he does. Nick, it’s all about having love in our hearts for everything. Look at these beautiful flowers that are right here in this room.

Nick: They smell good too.

Wayne: Yeah. The movie Oh, God!, remember with George Burns.

Nick: Yep, George Burns. Absolutely.

Wayne: There’s a line in there. He says something about make a flower from scratch. Now you understand what God is really like. Try to make one of those beautiful flowers there from scratch. Go out and just make one. Impossible.

Nick: The basic tapping, what we start with is “Even though,” and fill in the blank on the problem, “I deeply and completely love and accept myself.” I think that concept of self-love is so primal to healing. We tend to just––we want to push away. We want to reject the parts of ourselves that are in pain, that are angry. Tell me about self-acceptance. What does it mean to you? Why do you think that’s so important?

Wayne: It’s like if you don’t accept yourself, no one else is either. I think of it as we’re all creations of God. We all come from the same place. T. S. Eliot said that, “We shall not cease from exploration, but at the end of all of our exploring will be to return to the place from which we originated and to know it for the first time.” He was speaking about death. I don’t take that as an explanation of death. I take that as an explanation of an understanding that we all emerged from this place, the same place, that we’re all connected. Everything in this universe is connected.

Larry Dossey has just written a beautiful book called One Mind. I just finished reading it and it’s like it’s showing scientifically how everything is connected to everything in this universe and you can’t take anything and not see the connection to it, especially at the quantum level. Who you are is a creation of God. In my book Wishes Fulfilled I talk about one of the things you have to recognize is that your highest self is God. You must be like what you came from. A little tiny spark of who you are is the Dao, is God, is divine mind, is Krishna, is consciousness, is Buddha, whatever you want to call it.

In the Dao the opening line of the Dao says, “The Dao that can be named is not the Dao.” We can’t find a name for it, but the best name we can come for it is something called love. It’s just love. It’s divine love. This is what you came from. So if you don’t accept yourself, you’re not accepting something that is the creation of God. Truly, it’s like the greatest wisdom that you can have is the recognition that you are a piece of this divinity.I walk around with just a––Rumi said, “Sell your cleverness and purchase bewilderment.” I’m just in a state of bewilderment about it all. When you accept yourself you love yourself, and when you love yourself that’s what you have to give away and the only thing that you can give away. That’s what a saint is, is someone who can only give love away because that’s all they have inside.

That’s been my goal in my life is to have no enemies, particularly not to make an enemy of myself, to love everything about myself. What I was going through the last six months, this pain and stuff we tapped on down in Australia and so on, most of the time, and you’ve heard me say it many times, there’s a lesson in this for me.

I just did a Public Television special, another Public Television special. When I got an hour-and-a-half before the show to start, I was in one of these attacks again in the neck. I was like, how am I going to get through this thing and so on. I said a prayer. My wife was there. Two of my girls were there. We were in the room. I had my arms around them and I said, “If I’m supposed to endure this pain, for whatever reason that I don’t even understand yet, I’m willing to do it. But could I please just have the next couple of hours so that I could at least get through this experience?” It just dissolved. You were there. You were in the audience. I was able to go out there and do it.

Then the pain returned the next day and I went right back to that state. I still do it now. I can feel it even now as we’re talking about it a little bit here. Instead of cursing it, instead of being angry at it, I accept it as my dharma. Whatever it is that I have to learn from it, generally speaking every difficulty I’ve had in my life, getting divorced, literally being someone who was addicted to substances including alcohol, letting go of those kinds of beliefs that those are terrible things that I should be ashamed, they’ve been my greatest teachers. This pain was just another one of those things that generally speaking I now can go out and help people who live in chronic pain.

You do a lot of this with your tapping. I’ve seen you do it onstage with people. In fact, when we were out in Australia that one woman, what was it, she couldn’t even––

Nick: There was one lady with a frozen shoulder who couldn’t move her arm.

Wayne: Right, hadn’t been able to move her arm in years.

Nick: In 20 minutes she got it up like that.

Wayne: That comes from just accepting yourself. Actually, instead of cursing the pain, because when you curse the pain and get angry at it every cell of your being goes through that same anger. What you want to do is just get to that peaceful place within yourself where you say––when you trusting yourself, you’re really trusting in the wisdom that created you. The wisdom that that created you is infinite and it’s formless. Your thoughts are in that same category. Have thoughts that are aligned with that divine presence. You’ll see it going away.

Nick: I spent just a couple of weeks ago, three days in Stamford, Connecticut––we’re filming this in New York City right now––doing three days on pain relief.  Just incredible results, really deep people who had fibromyalgia and arthritis, a Native American with arthritis for years, just pain-free. You see him stretching and doing––he’s a marine. He was a Native American elder and he’s a marine, just an incredible guy. He’s pain-free.

It was a weekend of miracles. Then towards that end, I probably saw 80% to 90% of the people got really, really impressive results, and 10% to 20%––we actually did research, we’ll look at the numbers later––were struggling. At the end, the weekend is wrapping up and these people were surrounded by other people who have gotten amazing results, and now they’re even more frustrated and angry than they started. Some people said, what’s going on here? My answer was a) you made it here. The fact that you decided to spend three days working on this, shows that you are well on your way to healing. I said if this isn’t the thing that’s going to heal you, and the next thing will or the next thing will or the next thing will, ten times deep, however it is.

Wayne: Also Nick, you’ll never know how it’s going to show up. You don’t know how it’s going to show up. The example that I give is that I had this experience with John of God, that’s well documented and people know about, with Leukemia. It’s another one of those great blessings that came into my life. I’ve helped so many people with Leukemia, just because they said if Wayne Dyer can get it and not have it impact his life then certainly I can as well. You think maybe I need to tap and the tapping is going to be the thing that’s going to––but it might be something else. The tapping might just open you up to receiving.

I’ve done ten Public Television specials, and millions and millions of people have watched them. One woman happened to watch one of my shows, her name is Troy Egoscue. She’s now 50 years old. Had three kinds of cancer, brain cancer, lung cancer and breast cancer. She watched a show that I did and decided to change her attitude, just decided that she wasn’t going to live in fear anymore. She was going to send that away. She tried a new method. It’s called the Brzezinski method where she went on raw foods and things like this. Basically was sent there because of––this was seven years ago. Then I’m in this deep pain, that I just talked about, before the Public Television special.

The next day whatever miraculous thing was going on in the universe, Pete Egoscue, who has all of these clinics on pain relief and so on, living without chronic pain and so on, I call him on the phone because somebody gave me his number and they insisted and insisted. I kept saying I don’t want anybody else to touch me. They said please, you’ve just got to do that. So I did.

I called the number and Pete Egoscue answers the phone and finds out where I am. Ten miles, an hour later, he was in my hotel room. He said to me, he was sobbing when he walked in, he said, “My wife had said to me yesterday that if there’s one person that I would like to meet who is responsible for me overcoming this cancer it’s Wayne Dyer.” Then I called him that day. He just took me on as one of his––I’m doing these exercises and so on, and it’s dissipating. It’s like, how does the universe work? How does it work?

It’s like if you’re open to the possibilities of all of these things coming to you, God can do it through tapping, he can do it through a message that is being sent that just seems like such a coincidence and it doesn’t seem like it’s possible. There are no coincidences in this universe. It’s all be handled by a divine intelligence that each and every one of us are a part of. There’s so many ways for it to come to you, but you’ve got to be open to it. The 20% of people that you were talking about at the end probably had a closed mind about it and wouldn’t allow themselves to experience it.

Nick: One even admitted it at the end. The other thing, from a couple of them I heard several days later, now I’m getting the results. Now I’m back and things are happening. They’re shifting in a huge way that I didn’t realize.

Wayne: There’s no time. That’s another one of the great illusions that we live under is that time is something that’s measured by what’s on our watch. It’s not. That’s what we call chronos time, chronological time, cause and effect time. But there’s also something called eternal time. Eternal time is where you recognize that all of this is taken care of. My teacher––I was going to become a Jungian analyst. Carl Jung said at the same moment that you’re a protagonist in your own life and you’re making choices, at that very same moment he said you’re also an extra in a much larger drama. But within that eternal time there are choices that you can make, and when you do you start aligning yourself with this divine intelligence that takes care of everything. Every breath that you take, every hair that grows on your body, everything that takes place in your life is taken care of by an invisible intelligence. They call it the Dao. Lao Tzu said, “The Dao does nothing, but it leaves nothing undone.” All of you are not doing anything. You’re just being done. Let yourself be done in accordance with a divine plan, rather than the one that you have inside of you, your little ego tells you it ought to be the way it is.

Nick: You mentioned a few minutes ago giving it away, giving it all away. Since the first Tapping World Summit that we did, this is the sixth one now, I can’t believe how it’s gone, we’ve made it an effort every year to donate a lot of money. It’s literally been hundreds of thousands of dollars at this point. It doesn’t compare with your $200 million to PBS, but we do our best here.

Wayne: Two hundred and fifty, just in case…

Nick: Two hundred and fifty. I’m sorry. Not that we’re counting.

Wayne: You just cut out I had $50 million, that we’ve raised by the way.

Nick: Two hundred and fifty, yeah. We’ve been able to support children with cancer in Mexico and doing tapping with them, genocide survivors in Rwanda, veterans with PTSD. The latest thing the last year has been The Tapping Solution Foundation that we started working in Newtown, Connecticut, which is my hometown, working with that tragedy and the trauma and the pain and––

Wayne: The horror.

Nick: The horror.

Wayne: Yeah, right.

Nick: I know that through that you’ve gotten to meet––

Wayne: Scarlett Lewis, right.

Nick: Talk to me. What does it mean to you to give away? It’s important to me. Why is it important to you to give back?

Wayne: Think about it, Nick, seriously. You come into this world with nothing, with no thing, nothing. One moment you go from formless to form, from nowhere to now here. It’s all spelled the same. It’s just a little question of spacing. Then you live your life, and then you leave with nothing. Nothing. There’s not one thing that you can hang onto and let it go. Basically, the only thing you can do with your life, because you don’t get to own anything. You think that you own things, but it’s all being taken away. They say the last suit you wear doesn’t need any pockets. You’re not taking anything with you. If that’s the case, since you don’t get to own anything and you don’t get to have anything, the only thing you can do with your life is give it away.

Now ask yourself, what do you think God is like? Living like God lives, whatever this source that allows––even if you’re an atheist, you know that there’s some invisible intelligence that is bringing things from non-form to form. I think it was in one of Rumi’s poems he said that the divine intelligence that is constantly seducing the formless into form is the only thing that owns my heart. There’s something that is seducing the non-form into form. It seduced you from non-form. There was a moment when you didn’t exist and now you do exist. What is that world like? What is God like? What is this source like? What is the Dao like? Whatever you want to call it, what is it like? All it does is give things away. It doesn’t ask for anything back. It’s basically our original nature. Lao Tzu called it our original nature is to give, is to give away.

When you get into the idea that I own things, that this is mine and that nobody––you’re going against your divine nature. Our true nature is about giving. For me it’s like whatever amount of money I make and everything, it doesn’t make any difference. I just give it all away. Even when I write a book, or when I’m doingthis interview with you, it’s like nothing for me. I’m not getting anything for this. It’s just an opportunity to reach out.

Nick: I may buy you dinner. We’ll see. We’ll see.

Wayne: Maybe, right. That would be a first. No, I’m kidding. It’s your nature. It’s your nature to give. That’s really the great lesson of it all is just whatever it is that you have just give it away. It’s summarized by a great poet, Hafiz, who was a Persian poet back in the thirteenth century. He said that, “Even after all this time the sun never says to the earth, you owe me. Just think what a love like that can do. It lights up the whole word.” It lights up the whole world. A love that is like the sun saying to the earth. None of us could take a breath if it wasn’t for that sun, and it doesn’t ask anything back. God gives us all the air that we need and the water that we need to drink and the food that we need. All the opportunity to do that and doesn’t say I want this back, I insist on this. The churches do. The religions do. But God doesn’t. God asks nothing back. Be godlike. That’s what God realization is really about. That’s my ambition is to be living a God realized life. To act as if I were God, because I believe the highest place within each and every one of us is God, that we’re all God.

Nick: Beautiful. To wrap up, a lot of people watching this are about to embark on this ten-day adventure, this ten-day tapping World Summit. It’s a free event. They get to listen to free over the ten-day period, nothing but content, tons and tons of content of life transforming information. What words do you have for them? Why should they spend the time doing this weird tapping thing?

Wayne: It was weird to me. It’s new to me. To me it’s just another vehicle. It’s another tool for creating a happier more fulfilled life. I’ve spent––you have a colleague named Mary.

Nick: Yeah, Mary Ayers, who’s one of the presenters in the summit.

Wayne: Is she? Yeah. I tapped with her. I did 20 sessions with her. I probably have done 50 sessions with you over the last couple of years. It’s just something that makes you feel better. If you want to feel better and you want to increase your levels of happiness, and possibly remove some of the pain that’s in your life, I don’t know what more incentive you need than that. I think it’s a wonderful opportunity.

That’s why I’m here and why I agreed to come in and talk about it.

Nick: Thank you.

Wayne: You’re very welcome.

Nick: Thank you, Wayne.

Wayne: My pleasure. God bless you.

Nick: Thank you, everybody. This is Nick Ortner from www.thetappingsolution.com

Wayne Dyer and book


 

Nick: You mentioned a few minutes ago giving it away, giving it all away. Since the first Tapping World Summit that we did, this is the sixth one now, I can’t believe how it’s gone, we’ve made it an effort every year to donate a lot of money. It’s literally been hundreds of thousands of dollars at this point. It doesn’t compare with your $200 million to PBS, but we do our best here.

Wayne: Two hundred and fifty, just in case…

Nick: Two hundred and fifty. I’m sorry. Not that we’re counting.

Wayne: You just cut out I had $50 million, that we’ve raised by the way.

Nick: Two hundred and fifty, yeah. We’ve been able to support children with cancer in Mexico and doing tapping with them, genocide survivors in Rwanda, veterans with PTSD. The latest thing the last year has been The Tapping Solution Foundation that we started working in Newtown, Connecticut, which is my hometown, working with that tragedy and the trauma and the pain and––


Wayne: Mark Twain said that, “Forgiveness is the fragrance that the violet sheds on the heel that has crushed it.” It’s being able to send love. It’s being able to have love in your heart. I must say, Nick, that forgiveness is probably the single––if you had to put one word on why my life shifted when I was back in my thirties to a new direction, it was because of my forgiveness. My father, a man I never met, but he walked out on our family. My mother had three boys under the age of four. It was the Depression. I was born in 1940. My brothers were born in 1936, December, and then in 1938 in October and myself in May of 1940. So three-and-a-half years she had three children, and this man just left. He spent some time in prison. He was an alcoholic. He was abusive. He was a womanizer.

When my mother brought me home from the hospital in 1940, my father had moved in with another woman in Ann Arbor––we lived in Detroit, about 40 miles away––and left my oldest brother, who was just four, in charge of my other brother, David, who was 16 months. My mother came home to that. I heard those stories my whole life. I grew up with deep anger and resentment and hatred towards someone who could treat a woman that way.

 


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I went back to the car to drive back to New Orleans and go back. I was teaching up in New York at a university there, at St. John’s University. Something called me back and said, go back to the grave. I got out of the car, went back to the gravesite and the words came out of my mouth. I said, from this moment on I send you love, I forgive you, I let go of it. I said, who am I to judge you for what you did? You knew what you knew how to do given the conditions of your life, and I send you love.

At that time I was 34 years old. I was overweight. I was drinking. My writing was going nowhere. I had written some textbooks, but it wasn’t the kind of writing that I really wanted to do, I was in a relationship that wasn’t working at all. I was basically on an involuntary suicide mission the way I was living my life. I wouldn’t have lived another ten years probably.

 


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Today it’s 41 books later. I can attribute all of that to forgiveness. If you’ve got something in your heart that’s anything other than love, you’ve got to get it out. I think that’s a big part of what tapping is, is helping people get that out!

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